Simplifying FinTech and FinTech Laws: Key Takeaways for Indian FinTech Industry

The significant advancements in Fintech are directly impacting on the traditional financial sector. The regulators had to be cautious in order to not miss the train and should jump on the wagon of promoting financial innovation and stiff competition in the sector. The newcomers in the sector should be provided certain leniency in form of exemptions from a number of strict compliances which are used to curb the malpractices of the big corporations, for the sake of promoting competition in the market. This post is dealing with key takeaways from reports of different regulators’ committees in India. This is the last post in the series of ‘Simplifying FinTech and FinTech Laws’.

Fintech charged firms and businesses must work in tandem with the regulated entities, e.g. banks and regulated finance providers. The businesses that a bank can undertake are provided under Section 6 of the Banking Regulation Act, 1949 and there is no business outside Section 6 that can operate as the bank. Such provisions, therefore, incentivize banking companies to make fintech innovations in a narrower scope relevant to their operations. The archaic laws make it difficult for banks to undertake fintech innovations that can be of significant utility but are beyond the scope of financial regulation.

The Watal Committee Report noted this, that:

“The current law does not impose any obligation on authorised payment systems to provide open access to all PSPs. This has led to a situation where access to payment systems by new non-bank payments service providers, including FinTech firms, is restricted. Most of them can access payment systems only through the banks, which are also their competitors in the payments service industry. This, according to the Committee, has restricted the fast-paced expansion of digital payments in India by hindering competition from technology firms.”

Forming a comprehensive and non-discriminatory regulatory approach

Regulators and legislators are required to realign their legal approach to the Fintech services. There is a requirement of developing a deeper understanding of various Fintech services and their interaction in a financial environment with other fintech services. To provide the fintech space to work utmost to its potential, it is needed that it gets a level playing field in relation to the traditional banking and non-banking players. The practise of restricting the access of non-bank institutions to payment infrastructure, such as AEPS, has to be reevaluated and the proper steps to be taken. It is required from the end of Government and Regulatory bodies that they should adopt necessary measures in order to provide accessibility to national payment infrastructure and facilities to all fintech firms without any discrimination.

Providing Standards for Data Protection and Privacy

All the fintech companies are required to invest significantly in self-regulating policies to prevent privacy risks. Fintech companies should be provided with the standards of data protection as soon as possible by government and regulators. It is evident that the provisions of the Personal Data Protection Bill, 2019 can significantly affect the growth of Fintech companies. Therefore, the standards adopted for fintech companies by regulators should be reviewed with respect to data protection and privacy concerns. The government and regulators specific to finance of the country should start focusing on the valuation of data that is processed by banking companies and recommend practices to safeguard consumer interests.

Open Data principles should govern the financial sector in order to enhance Competition

The regulators should pay heed to the open data policy among participants of a fintech sector. The regulators should begin with the mandatory norms directing financial service companies to encourage banking institutions to enable participants to access the databases of their rejected credit applications on a specific platform on a consensual basis. The practice of the UK with respect to Open Data Regulations in Banking can be adopted, where banking institutions on the basis of consent framework allow data to be available to banking partners in order to foster competition. Even the RBI Steering Committee on Fintech recommended:

“It also recommends that all financial sector regulators study the potential of open data access among their respective regulated entities, for enhancing competition in the provision of financial services.”

The KYC process should be reformed with respect to the Supreme Court’s Judgment on Aadhaar’s validity

Fintech businesses are the most affected entities due to the striking down of Section 57 of the Aadhaar Act as it invalidated the online KYC process. The online KYC and authentication provided the required efficiency and convenience to fintech firms with respect to their endeavours of on-boarding as many as consumers on their digital platform. It is recommended that alternatives to the mandatory linking to Aadhaar should be adopted in the form of possible video-based KYC, such that the documents as verified must be protected and processed with the prior consent of the consumer.

Other key recommendations

1. It is recommended that the adequate cybersecurity, anti-money laundering and fraud control measures should be adopted by investing in technologies and guidelines that can prevent fraud.

2. Technical innovations should be monitored with respect to the potential risk that innovation carries in operation under the contemporaneous legal landscape of the country.

3. A self-regulatory body to facilitate the needs of fintech is much needed as for the RBI it is still turning out to be difficult to replace the existing regulatory structure. A regulatory mechanism allowing the broader participative consultation approach should be adopted.

4. Regulators should invest in Reg-Tech (“Reg Tech is a sub-set of FinTech that focuses on technologies that facilitate the delivery of regulatory requirements more efficiently and effectively than existing capabilities. In July 2015 the FCA issued a call for input entitled ‘Supporting the development and adoption of Reg Tech’.”)

5. The majority of economies have adopted the practice of setting up of the regulatory sandboxes catalyzing the fintech innovations. It is recommended that RBI should continue with the introduction of the mechanisms, like regulatory sandboxes, enabling the adaptation of regulatory initiatives which will play a key role in maintaining India’s competitive edge.

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